space/place

Urban Giants

A short historical documentary about the intertwined telecom history of the Western Union and AT&T Long Lines buildings

Children of the Drone

Marcel Duchamp had his urinal. Andy Warhol had his soup can. James Bridle has his . . . drone? With his first major U.S. museum exhibition opening this week at Washington’s Corcoran Gallery of Art and College of Art & Design, the young British artist is spearheading a conceptual-art movement—“the New Aesthetic”—through Tumblr, Twitter, and Instagram, […]

TED Talk: What is the Internet, really?

When a squirrel chewed through a cable and knocked him offline, journalist Andrew Blum started wondering what the Internet was really made of. So he set out to go see it — the underwater cables, secret switches and other physical bits that make up the net.

Here but Not Here

Architecture has yet to acknowledge the impact of social media on our experience of physical space. Our experience of the world around us has changed to a degree not seen since the arrival of trains and cars. But it’s not clear to me that the process of design has meaningfully acknowledged that.

Cold Comforts

A look at the latest research bases housing Antarctic scientists.

Netscapes (WIRED)

The Internet surrounds us like air, saturating our offices and our homes. But it’s not confined to the ether. You can touch it. You can map it. And you can photograph it. Here are five postcards from the journey of a single bit, as data flashes from sea to wired sea.

Metaphor Remediation: A New Ecology for the City (Places Journal)

Confronting climate change and ecological collapse, environmentalists increasingly see urban areas as the most promising engines of sustainability. Two converging realizations — the efficiency of cities, and the global demographic trend towards urbanization — are inspiring a new generation to focus on urban and technology-based solutions to environmental problems.

The Bandwidth of Urban Experience (Wired UK)

When it comes to technology and cities, today’s thrilling development – “thrilling”, that is, if you like real cities and corporeal people – is that social networking is enhancing urban places.

Redesigning the Sky (WIRED)

Nearly all US flight delays can be traced to the snarl of jets over New York City. How do you squeeze more efficiency out of an archaic air traffic control system? Redesign the sky.

Infrastructure: Tracking the Future (Metropolis Mag)

The city begins crumbling as soon as it has been constructed. Beneath every new project lies the rubble of another. In the United States today, that’s an important insight. Infrastructure is being revealed, in the sense that it’s attracting more attention than it has in decades. But that attention is divided between repair and renewal, despair and hope.

In Praise of Slowness (Urban Omnibus)

The city is slow, and we write too fast. Hollywood marketers talk about “eventizing” a movie, and architecture marketers have caught on to the strategy as well.

James Corner: The Long View (Metropolis)

Corner has spent the last 25 years becoming that guy in a deliberate attempt to reinvent the field of landscape architecture by pushing aside its second-fiddle status and antiurban tendencies and claiming a more ambitious agenda: to design the postindustrial city.